(Source: Spotify)

‘Do you believe in love?’ he said.
Sometimes I believe that love dies but hope springs eternal. Sometimes I believe that hope dies but love springs eternal. Sometimes I believe that sex plus guilt equals love, and sometimes I believe sex plus guilt equals good sex. Sometimes I believe that love is as natural as the tides, and sometimes I believe that love is an act of will. Sometimes I believe that some people are better at love than others, and sometimes I believe that everyone is faking it. Sometimes I believe that love is essential, and sometimes I believe that the only reason love is essential is that otherwise you spend all your time looking for it.
‘Yes,’ I said. ‘I do.’
Why extremists always focus on women remains a mystery to me. But they all seem to. It doesn’t matter what country they’re in or what religion they claim. They all want to control women. They want to control how we dress. They want to control how we act. They even want to control the decisions we make about our own health and our own bodies. Yes, it is hard to believe but even here at home we have to stand up for women’s rights and we have to reject efforts to marginalize any one of us, because America has to set an example for the entire world.
We must begin to undersand that a revolution entails not only the willingness to lay our lives on the firing line and get killed. In some ways, this is an easy commitment to make. To die for the revolution is a one-shot deal; to live for the revolution means taking on the more difficult commitment of changing our day-to-day life patterns.
The greatest crime that society commits is that of wasting the money which it should for children on things that will destroy them and itself as well.
"I live too comfortably because government services …"

"I live too comfortably because government services …"

(Source: tastefullyoffensive)

Protesters in Syria (via tpm)

Protesters in Syria (via tpm)

(Source: theirgraves)

newyorker:

The Caging of America; Why do we lock up so many people?

The scale and the brutality of our prisons are the moral scandal of  American life. Every day, at least fifty thousand men—a full house at  Yankee Stadium—wake in solitary confinement, often in “supermax” prisons  or prison wings, in which men are locked in small cells, where they see  no one, cannot freely read and write, and are allowed out just once a  day for an hour’s solo “exercise.” (Lock yourself in your bathroom and  then imagine you have to stay there for the next ten years, and you will  have some sense of the experience.) Prison rape is so endemic—more than  seventy thousand prisoners are raped each year—that it is routinely  held out as a threat, part of the punishment to be expected. The subject  is standard fodder for comedy, and an uncoöperative suspect being  threatened with rape in prison is now represented, every night on  television, as an ordinary and rather lovable bit of policing. The  normalization of prison rape—like eighteenth-century japery about  watching men struggle as they die on the gallows—will surely strike our  descendants as chillingly sadistic, incomprehensible on the part of  people who thought themselves civilized. Though we avoid looking  directly at prisons, they seep obliquely into our fashions and manners.  Wealthy white teen-agers in baggy jeans and laceless shoes and multiple  tattoos show, unconsciously, the reality of incarceration that acts as a  hidden foundation for the country.

- In this week’s issue, Adam Gopnik writes about mass incarceration and criminal justice in America: http://nyr.kr/A75iOm
Photograph by Steve Liss.

newyorker:

The Caging of America; Why do we lock up so many people?

The scale and the brutality of our prisons are the moral scandal of American life. Every day, at least fifty thousand men—a full house at Yankee Stadium—wake in solitary confinement, often in “supermax” prisons or prison wings, in which men are locked in small cells, where they see no one, cannot freely read and write, and are allowed out just once a day for an hour’s solo “exercise.” (Lock yourself in your bathroom and then imagine you have to stay there for the next ten years, and you will have some sense of the experience.) Prison rape is so endemic—more than seventy thousand prisoners are raped each year—that it is routinely held out as a threat, part of the punishment to be expected. The subject is standard fodder for comedy, and an uncoöperative suspect being threatened with rape in prison is now represented, every night on television, as an ordinary and rather lovable bit of policing. The normalization of prison rape—like eighteenth-century japery about watching men struggle as they die on the gallows—will surely strike our descendants as chillingly sadistic, incomprehensible on the part of people who thought themselves civilized. Though we avoid looking directly at prisons, they seep obliquely into our fashions and manners. Wealthy white teen-agers in baggy jeans and laceless shoes and multiple tattoos show, unconsciously, the reality of incarceration that acts as a hidden foundation for the country.

- In this week’s issue, Adam Gopnik writes about mass incarceration and criminal justice in America: http://nyr.kr/A75iOm

Photograph by Steve Liss.

Grades are an illusion, your passion and insight are reality; your work is worth more than mere congruence to an answer key; persistence in the face of a skeptical authority figure is a powerful ability; fitting in is a short-term strategy, standing out pays off in the lon run; and if you care enough about work to be criticized, you’ve learned enough for today.
I don’t buy the notion that we have to make a choice between having clean air and clean water and growing this economy.